Coral Nurseries – How it started

November 5th, 2018|

Having been facinated by a coral nursery while we were diving with Michael Sherratt  early last year, we have been in touch with Dr. Craig Dahlgren who explained us with enthusiasm the mechanism of the coral nurseries. We had the chance to participate to one of his expedition at Sandy Cay’s reserve in the Abacos and offer our diving experience to help them to install 3x nurseries

Bahamas Marine Mammals Research Organisation (BMMRO) – Day & Work

October 19th, 2017|

Diane and Charlotte from BMMRO wanted to share with BEP a day out experiencing Mammals. We have been very grateful to the weather forecast on last August 13th, 2017 which could not be any better. Calm sea, windless, and only sun was the perfect day for this 9 hours experience on the sea looking for whales and dolphins. Before that, Diane and Charlotte presented us their objectives and  believes in

Coral Nursery

October 19th, 2017|

Dr. Craig Dahlgren is a marine ecologist who studies a wide range of topics related to tropical marine ecosystems. His work includes studies of mangrove and coral reef ecosystems, efficacy of marine protected areas, and population dynamics of fishery species ranging from traditional Caribbean fishery species like Nassau grouper and Caribbean spiny lobster to emerging fisheries like sea cucumbers, parrotfish, sponges and gorgonians. This work has led to

Abaco Park Moorings – it started…

June 28th, 2017|

Ch. de La Baume-BEP Foundation replacing old lines and buoys To replace and maintain moorings is a challenge. You need to have calm water, nice weather, low tide (if possible) and available volunteers ! All these conditions need to be in place in order to make it. So far, buoys’s replacements took place in the Abacos to Sandy Cay, Fowl Cay and Marmaid between April, May and June.

Conch, a marine resource for the future

May 3rd, 2016|Tags: , , |

Conch is important to the Bahamas as a cultural icon and also an important source of income (conch fishing). Sadly, harvesting juvenile conch is a common practice in the Bahamas. Each juvenile conch taken is potentially thousands of new conchs that will never be. Surveys of conch grounds at numerous locations in the Bahamas indicate a decline in the number of queen conchs. And when the number of conch